published by Del Mar Community Alliance. Inc.
Inside the OCTOBER 2018 Print Issue

Click on cover for October print issue in pdf format.

EDITORIAL: Sandpiper Endorses Worden for City Council


Candidates
Q&A


VIDEO:
Candidate Forum


Click on any photo to view a full-length video of the candidate forum Presented by the League of Women Voters on September 13 at Town Hall.


Ballot Choices

Mike Levin

Measure MM: School Bond

Measure R: Lines in the Sand

Measure T: Mixed-use Residential-941


Roving Teen Reporter
Sitting the SATs

Eve Gross


It’s a Dam Party!
Jeff Barnouw


Safety Scans
Preventive Lifeguarding

Jon Edelbrock


$treetscape: Do It All!
Del Mar Turns Left
Civic Center Solar


DM Resort in Review
Ann Gardner


Java Jitters
50-Cup Coffee Challenge

Julie Maxey-Allison


Night Raiders
Julie Maxey-Allison


Market Moves to Civic Center
Julie Maxey-Allison


GUN SHOWS ON HOLD
Don Mosier


DMF: A Few Of My Favorite Things
Bob Gans


DMCC: October 2018
Ashley Simpkins


Extra copies of the Sandpiper are available at: City Hall; the Del Mar Community Building on 9th Street; the Library; the Powerhouse; the Farmers’ Market; the Carmel Valley Library;the Solana Beach Library and the Solana Beach Community Center.


Calendars

DM Calendar

DMCC Calendar

DMF Calendar

DM Library Calendar

DM Village Association

Public Meetings

City Council

Design Review Board

Planning Commission

 
Click to enlarge.
OCTOBER
2018

NCTD plans Fence
NO TO PEOPLE ON BLUFFS
Pipe Up from Al Tarkington, 11th Street
The railroad at 11th Street.
Photo Julie Maxey-Allison.
Click to enlarge.

A recent newspaper article quoted North County Transit District blaming people walking on the Del Mar bluffs for bluff erosion.  Several years ago, they were blaming ground squirrels for eroding the ocean bluffs.  What a joke!

Perhaps we should place the blame on the heavily laden freight trains that shake the ground as they    rumble down the tracks several times each day.    The Coaster and Amtrak trains shake the ground thirty times every day!    And NCTD doesn’t mention the damage those trains do to the fragile (their words) bluff.

What a lame excuse for preventing beach goers from crossing the tracks.

People have been using Eleventh Street in Del Mar for public beach access ever since Col. Jacob Taylor constructed the path to the beach in the 1890s.  That’s right.  The 11th Street path to the beach was constructed in the mid 1890s!   When the Santa Fe Railway relocated the “Surf Line” rail tracks to the ocean bluff in 1909, they built a wooden bridge across the tracks to preserve beach access. The bridge over the tracks stood for 60 years until Santa Fe tore down (pre-Coastal Act) the bridge in 1969.

NCTD wants to reduce or eliminate any liability it has regarding people crossing the tracks.  There are solutions for that, but one of them is not fencing off the beach to the thousands that cross the tracks every year.

There are safe at-grade pedestrian crossings all over the world.  Even North County Transit District has at grade crossings on their Sprinter line to between Oceanside and Escondido.  Or, replace the old bridge between 10th and 11th Streets.

The public has had access to the beach at 11th Street for over 125 years!

As a San Diego public agency, NCTD has an obligation to preserve public beach access.  And to deny public beach access is clearly at odds with the intent of the Calif Coastal Act.

Note: Al Tarkington has lived on 11th Street next to the train tracks since 1970.

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Update 20/05/18
Del Mar Civic Center
wins an Orchid

The “beautiful detailing” of the Del Mar Civic Center and Town Hall has won a 2018 Orchid for Architecture from the San Diego Architectural Foundation.

City officials accepted the award during ceremonies Oct. 4 in San Diego, where Assemblyman Todd Gloria served as the awards presenter.

“The jury was impressed by the beautiful detailing and the masterful execution of the new Del Mar Civic Center and City Hall, as well as its ability to express the culture and physical attributes of Del Mar,” Gloria said. “Jurors noted the effective integration of the building into the site’s topography and the site into the village streetscape.”

Photo Zemina Zaferakis.  Click to enlarge.

The $19.1 million Civic Center on Camino del Mar at 10th Street opened in May.

Designed by the Miller Hull Partnership, the municipal complex was one of 118 nominees and one of 16 to receive an Orchid for its outstanding architecture.

Spurlock LandscapeArchitects designed the Del Mar Civic Center’s exterior spaces. The general contractor was R.A. Burch Construction Co. - EC Constructors, A Joint Venture.

For 42 years, the Orchids & Onions program has celebrated or scorned the buildings, parks, plazas and other developed spaces that make up the region’s built environment. 

Categories include architecture, landscape, interior design, historic preservation, adaptive re-use and urban planning.

In Del Mar, the Civic Center is designed to protect public views and maximize public access for gatherings, the Saturday farmers market and enjoyment of the plaza and viewing decks.

Single-story and low-slung, the sandstone-colored City Hall sits beneath a gently-sloping roof supported by exposed, heavy timbers. A breezeway connects the building to a glass and wood-sided Town Hall, which is crowned by a multi-angular, glass-and-timber cupola.

 
Update 09/29/18
Rideshare Week
October 1 – 5

The City of Del Mar is participating in Rideshare Week! Join us by pledging to carpool (including Waze Carpool, Lyft Line, and UberPOOL), vanpool, or take transit during National Rideshare Week, October 1 – 5.

Pledge to share the ride on the iCommute website and you’ll be automatically entered to win an Apple Watch. It’s your life, enjoy the ride!

 
October Print Issue
EDITORIAL: Sandpiper Endorses Worden for City Council

Few have done as much as Dwight Worden to bring to fruition the small town vision laid out in our Community Plan. Recognized throughout the state as an expert in environmental and municipal law, Dwight has been using his know-how for Del Mar’s benefit for more than four decades. During that time he has served our community in many capacities as our City Attorney, as a legal counsel defending our interests in court, as legal counsel for several regional organizations, as a legal advisor for environmental and grassroots citizen groups, as the author of the Beach Protection Initiative (BPI) and Measure B, as a community advocate, as a contributing volunteer on numerous city advisory committees, as a Council Member and our current Mayor.

Dwight’s leadership style involves respectful listening, resourceful problem solving, and facilitation of community consensus. His ideas and accomplishments are grounded in the values of our Community Plan. Even in the face of contentious issue discussions, Dwight treats everyone with respect and helps guide all toward civil discourse.

His many accomplishments through the decades are impressive. In the last four years on the Council he has guided the development of our new civic center on time and on budget, insisted on conservative financial planning, pushed plans for infrastructure improvements to our sewer, water, and streets. He was instrumental in shaping our strategic plan for sea level rise and fashioning a compromise plan for short term rentals that protects our residential core.

His priorities for the next few years are impressive including completion of Shores Park, utility under grounding, downtown streetscape using Measure Q sales tax funds. He will continue to support the improved design review guidelines to protect neighborhoods. He will work to gain influence in fairground activities that impact traffic, noise, and the fragile lagoon estuary. He plans to achieve compliance with our state-mandated affordable housing goals in ways that fit with our community character. Other priorities to be addressed include beach access, bluff protection, rail safety, and citizen involvement in large development projects.

Del Mar always has a very full agenda in our efforts to protect our small town character. We feel confident that Dwight Worden has incredible qualifications and values to lead us through these challenges. We ask our readers to support his candidacy.

There are three other candidates for the second vacancy on the Council. In recent years Terry Gaasterland has served on the Finance Committee, Design Review Board, and chaired the Sea Level Rise Committee. Dan Quirk served a term on the Finance Committee and is credited as the author of Measure Q. The other candidate is Brian Fletcher. We urge voters to scrutinize these three, listen to their debates, and settle on a choice as the most promising for a new voice on our Council. We think a blend of Worden’s leadership capabilities with a new voice from among the other candidates will produce a smart electoral outcome for Del Mar’s future.

 
October Print Issue
CANDIDATE Q&A

Dear Candidates for City Council. The Sandpiper wants to help readers be very clear about where you - Brian, Terry, Dan, and Dwight - stand on key issues. Our goal is specifics, not generalities. Voters need to know exactly where you stand and what they can expect you to do if you are in office. Please answer within a budget of no more than a total of 600 words for all questions.
             The Sandpiper Editors

1. More than 3 million pounds of highly radioactive spent fuel rods are currently being loaded into steel canisters at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Stations (SONGS) only 32 miles upwind from Del Mar. These canisters are a few yards from the ocean, 18 inches above the mean high tide line, and in an area vulnerable to earthquakes and tsunamis. How will you support actions  to make sure that this “temporary” storage site does not become permanent?

2. Current predictions are that global warming will contribute to more frequent and intense wildfires in California and sea level rise that could be as high as 12 feet by 2100. Will you support priority funding for planning and adaption strategies  (including sand replenishment) to prepare for these impacts ?

3.How will you support efforts to reduce the impact of fairground activities on our community including traffic, noise, and gun shows?

4. Developers of the proposed Del Mar Resort complex above North Beach recently held their second Citizen Participation Workshop at Town Hall. Do their preliminary plans coincide with your expectations for the 16-acre piece of property currently zoned residential?

5. The City Council recently agreed to pursue affordable housing strategies outlined in the 5/22 report. how will you support planning and funding efforts to achieve state-mandated housing goals?

6. On short-term rentals, do you support the zoning change adopted by the Council to allow STRs in residential zones for up to 28 days/year, in 7-day increments, with unlimited STRs in most commercial zones?

Click here for the candidates' answers.

 
October Print Issue
GUN SHOWS ON HOLD
Don Mosier

When confronted with the “sea” of orange T-shirts,
a nearby attendee was heard to say: “Well,
we are really outnumbered this time.”
Photo Ann Gardner
Click to enlarge.

The Board of Directors of the 22nd District Agricultural Association (22nd DAA) voted 8-1 (Penniman no) on September 11 to review gun show policies and prohibit new gun show contracts in 2019. Two previously contracted shows in late September and early December of this year will proceed as scheduled.
The staff of the 22nd DAA was directed to present new policies for gun shows no later than the December 2019 meeting of the Board. The direction to staff, which was reinforced by a strong letter of support from Assemblymember Todd Gloria, was to:

• Conduct gun shows only for educational and safety training purposes
• Consider banning possession of guns and ammunition on state property
• Align gun show contract language with recent changes in federal and state law
• Enhance security plans for future shows with added safety plans
• Consider raising the age for show entrants
• Grant rights to the 22nd DAA to perform an audit to confirm that gun show sponsors (currently Crossroads of the West) are in full compliance with California penal codes

Over 70 public speakers submitted comments during the meeting, including Rose Ann and Ira Sharp of NeverAgainCA. Board President Steve Shewmaker voiced his concerns after discovering that self-assembled weapons, armor-piercing bullets, and hollow-point bullets were being sold at the gun shows. The owners of the Crossroads of the West franchise have been convicted of violating federal gun laws, and they have circumvented this issue (which would have prohibited them operating in California) by transferring operational authority to the daughter of the founder.

Todd Gloria’s letter of September 10th stated that he was “prepared to act by way of legislation should the 22nd DAA Board be unable to take meaningful action. I have prepared language for introduction in the next legislative session should that become necessary.”

The supporters of gun shows and Crossroads of the West vowed to fight the action taken by the 22nd DAA Board. Let’s hope that the resolve shown by the Board this September will be reflected by their decisions in
December 2019.

 
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